Sunday, July 17, 2011

Andrew Jackson On the Paper Money System and Its Consequences

Jesse's Café Américain
Saturday, July 16, 2011

http://jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com/2011/07/andrew-jackson-on-paper-money-system.html

As the US Federal Reserve System approaches its 100th Anniversary in a few years, and as central banks and their political allies around the world promote the bailout and enrichment of the biggest banks and wealthiest individuals, to be paid for by the impoverishment and sacrifice of the people, it might be well to remember the lessons of history with regard to a fiat currency controlled by private corporations under the guise of an 'independent monetary authority.'
"The paper system being founded on public confidence and having of itself no intrinsic value, it is liable to great and sudden fluctuations, thereby rendering property insecure and the wages of labor unsteady and uncertain.

The corporations which create the paper money can not be relied upon to keep the circulating medium uniform in amount. In times of prosperity, when confidence is high, they are tempted by the prospect of gain or by the influence of those who hope to profit by it to extend their issues of paper beyond the bounds of discretion and the reasonable demands of business; and when these issues have been pushed on from day to day, until public confidence is at length shaken, then a reaction takes place, and they immediately withdraw the credits they have given, suddenly curtail their issues, and produce an unexpected and ruinous contraction of the circulating medium, which is felt by the whole community.

The banks by this means save themselves, and the mischievous consequences of their imprudence or cupidity are visited upon the public. Nor does the evil stop here. These ebbs and flows in the currency and these indiscreet extensions of credit naturally engender a spirit of speculation injurious to the habits and character of the people. We have already seen its effects in the wild spirit of speculation in the public lands and various kinds of stock which within the last year or two seized upon such a multitude of our citizens and threatened to pervade all classes of society and to withdraw their attention from the sober pursuits of honest industry.

It is not by encouraging this spirit that we shall best preserve public virtue and promote the true interests of our country; but if your currency continues as exclusively paper as it now is, it will foster this eager desire to amass wealth without labor; it will multiply the number of dependents on bank accommodations and bank favors; the temptation to obtain money at any sacrifice will become stronger and stronger, and inevitably lead to corruption, which will find its way into your public councils and destroy at no distant day the purity of your Government."
Andrew Jackson, Farewell Address, March 4, 1837


For further reading:
"Andrew Jackson on Repealing a Central Bank", ZeroHedge, February 13, 2011
"Andrew Jackson: Then and Now", Dan O'Connor, Mises Daily, January 19, 2010
"Andrew Jackson and the Bankwar", Tony D`Urso, March 6, 2003

2 comments:

  1. Jackson is, by far, one of my favorite presidents. The courage of standing up to the banks on behalf of the people was enormous.

    BulMoose.wordpress.com

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  2. Nice to see a side of Jackson not often revealed. He's usually touted as the bad guy. Instead of a War Hero or here as a visionary of the power of the federal reserve.

    http://ushistorysite.com/andrew_jackson_bio.php

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